uninspired

I am in a rut. So I decided to go on a wild Google chase to see what literature exists out there on being uninspired.

Lifehack posted about it and while I was scrolling through their article, this popped up:

It’s never too late to start over. If you weren’t happy with yesterday, try something different today. Don’t stay stuck. Do better.

Of course it was the prompt to sign up for their newsletter, so I skipped on by (on account of having too many newsletter subscriptions as it stands).

They listed twelve things that uninspired people do. If I’m being honest, I’m guilty of about 5 & 1/2 of those twelve things.

  1. They try to get through the day instead of getting something from the day.* (So guilty.)
  2. They seek entertainment instead of development.
  3. They focus on what is wrong instead of what is right.* (I want to be a “glass half-full” person, but I’m thirsty.)
  4. “What if…?” isn’t in their vocabulary. (This is the thirsty I’m talking about. I “what if” myself to death sometimes.)
  5. They see what they can get away with, instead of what they can do.* (I know what I can do, but I’m not inspired to do it.)
  6. They focus on today only and don’t think about tomorrow.
  7. They seek followers that are also uninspired.
  8. They seek activity over accomplishments.* (I get bored, and stuck in the “what if” cycle.)
  9. They do what is easy. (I do hard things, too, but when feeling uninspired, easy is easy.)
  10. They want something handed to them.* (Seriously, please just ONCE?)
  11. They care more about what’s in it for them than the good of all.
  12. They make excuses instead of taking action.* (See note about the easy stuff. Change is hard.)

extroverted work?

Somewhere in my journey, I thought it would be a good idea to get into events. Some ten or so years later, I’m still plunking away in the field, but have moved from small fundraisers, to seniors’ recreation, to large fundraisers and campaigns, to continuing professional development (and back to small fundraisers). And, more and more, I’ve come to accept my true, introverted nature.

It’s a work-life balance.